Hello, Doug. Question about the method of calculation of this method. I lived in Canada for 15 years during my OAS eligibility period, then moved to the United States and worked there for another 10 years before moving abroad. I understand that the agreement allows me to obtain AEO payments. But my question is: what do I receive? For the United States, the agreement covers social security taxes (including the Medicare part in the United States) and social security benefits for old-age, disability and survivors` insurance. It does not cover U.S. Medicare or security pension supplement benefits. For Canada, the agreement applies to the old-age insurance program and the Canada pension plan. The agreement with Québec applies to the Québec Pension Plan.

Normally, people who are not U.S. citizens can only receive U.S. Social Security benefits outside the U.S. if they meet certain requirements. However, under the agreement, you can receive benefits for as long as you reside in Canada, regardless of your nationality. If you are not a U.S. or Canadian citizen and live in another country, you may not be eligible to receive benefits. The restrictions imposed on the United States are explained in the publication your Payments While You Are Outside The United States (publication number 05-10137). Under the agreement, U.S. social security credits concluded after 1965 may be considered at the same time as CPP or QPP work credits, if necessary, in order to meet the minimum requirements for disability or survivors` benefits of the CPP or PQPP.

Suppose I can use my U.S. work history to obtain authorization under the U.S./Canadian agreement, how would my benefit amount be calculated? I ask because I am trying to determine the relative advantages of the U.S. Social Security benefit over the CPP benefit. The SS counsellor I spoke with said that I could only receive benefits under one of the two plans, not both. My annual income in Canada is about $80,000 to $90,000 a year. In the last 6 and 7 years of my working years in the United States, my income was comparable to this one, but it was much lower and the total amount I can get from SS is relatively small because they calculate benefits based on an average over a number of years. I guess I would do better under CPP, but I do not know how my benefit amount would be calculated here in Canada. Perhaps you could let me know. Thank you very much. If you don`t want to claim benefits, but want more information about the agreement, write to: Hello Joe – The agreement allows you to fulfill the 20-year requirement for OAS payment outside of Canada, but the amount of your OAS is based solely on residency in Canada, so it`s 15/40s of $600 = $225 per month…