In the simplest form of a sale in which a business for sale is entirely owned by a single person or parent company and is purchased by a single buyer, there are only two parties to the agreement. However, other parties may be involved, for example if several shareholders of the company are sold. In these cases, each of the shareholders must conclude the sales contract to sell their shares. In essence, the sales contract defines all the details of the transaction, so both parties share the same understanding. Among the conditions usually included in the agreement are the purchase price, the closing date, the amount of serious money that the buyer must deposit as a deposit and the list of items included in the sale and not. Under article 53A, the assignee has the right to object to any attempt by the assignor to disrupt the rightful holding of the assignee of the contract of sale, and his position as an applicant or defendant should make no difference. The buyer can only use the shield as a defendant, and not as a plaintiff, to undo the spirit of Article 53A himself, because it will be possible for an overpowered contemptuous to expropriate the buyer by force, even against contractual concessions, and to force him to go to court as a plaintiff[2]. A sales document is a document that proves that the seller has transferred absolute ownership of the property to the buyer. Through this document, the rights and shares of ownership are acquired by the new owner. The lease gives the tenant a bargai In accordance with the Indian Registration Act of 1908, any agreement to transfer shares in real estate worth more than one hundred rupees must be registered. Therefore, if you have purchased real estate as part of a purchase agreement without a proper deed of sale following, you will not get any right or interest in the property that would be transferred as part of the purchase agreement. . .

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