Company A enters into a FRA with Company B in which Company A obtains a fixed interest rate of 5% on a face value of $1 million in one year. In return, Company B receives the one-year LIBOR rate set in three years on the nominal amount. The contract is settled in cash in a payment method at the beginning of the term period, with interest in an amount calculated with the rate of the contract and the duration of the contract. A significant part of FRA trading takes place through brokers operating all over the world. FRA brokers usually trade in euros and swaps. The main brokers are Tullet & Tokyo Foreign Exchange; Garvin Guy Butler; Godsell, Astley &Pearce; Fulton Prebon; and Eurobroker. The nominal amount of $5 million is not exchanged. Instead, the two companies involved in this transaction use this figure to calculate the interest rate spread. In the financial field, an interest rate agreement in advance (FRA) is an interest rate derivative (IRD).

These include a linear IRD with strong associations with interest rate swaps (IRSs). Future Interest Rate Agreements (FRA) are over-the-counter contracts between parties that set the interest rate to be paid on an agreed date in the future. A FRA is an agreement to exchange an interest rate bond on a nominal amount. For example, if the Federal Reserve Bank is raising U.S. interest rates, the so-called monetary tightening cycle, companies would likely want to raise their borrowing costs before interest rates rise too dramatically. In addition, FRA are very flexible and settlement dates can be tailored to the needs of transaction participants. A „three-on-nine“ FRA has an approval rate of 4.75%. The credit risk of FRA is low, but higher than the credit risk of futures.

Term credit risk is minimal due to the day-to-day margining and risk management of futures clearing institutions. In the event of default by a FRA counterparty, a financial institution may lose the cost of replacing the contract. The risk of loss depends on both the probability of an adverse movement in interest rates and the probability of a default by the counterparty. Suppose a financial institution buys a 10 percent FRA to protect against an increase in LIBOR. . . .